HFMA03152U  Modul 2: De-Westernising Media Studies

Volume 2014/2015
Education
Master in Film and Media Studies
Content

The field of media studies has long been dominated by normative theories rooted in Western norms, values and traditions. As the field is developing and theories have become increasingly difficult to apply on non-Western (and especially non-democratic) societies, a deconstruction of Western hegemony seems inevitable and a need for de-westernising media studies has arisen.

This course aims at broadening the perspective of media studies by focusing on media outside the Western hemisphere. We will see how media connects to power in different forms of societies and answer questions such as who and what influence the media? We will discuss how globalisation is changing both society and the media and consider the consequences globally and locally.

We will start by looking at classic normative theories of the media, and the context in which they were developed, and examine how they might be broadened to include non-Western societies. We will in particular talk about media systems to create an understanding of the relationship between media and politics and we will talk about how differences in ownership and regulation of media affect news selection and news presentation.

During the course, we will look at specific cases and discuss different themes such as the concept of press freedom, degrees of censorship and roles of media and journalists. Guest lecturers will also be invited to present their research or share their experiences working with media in non-Western countries.

Active participation is expected by all course participants as group work on selected cases is part of the course.

The course is relevant for students wanting a better understanding of media systems, media in non-western societies and the consequences of globalisation on media as well as students interested in international development and media development in particular.
Learning Outcome
Master in Film and Media Studies 2013-curriculum:
Module 2: Culture, genres and aesthetics: HFMK03021E 
Module 7: Optionel subject 1: HFMK03131E
Module 7: Optionel subject 2: HFMK03141E
Module 7: Optional subject 3: HFMK03151E
Module 7: Optional subject 4: HFMK03161E

Curriculum for the Master’s Programme in Film Studies, The 2008 Curriculum:
Module 6: Optionel subject 1: HFVA04171E
Module 6: Optionel subject 1: HFVA04181E
Module 6: Optionel subject 2: HFVA04191E
Module 6: Optionel subject 2: HFVA04201E

Curriculum for Master's Programme in Media Studies, The 2008 Curriculum:
Module 1: Organizational and institutional analysis: HMEK03111E
Module 3: Media, aesthetics and genres: HMEK03131E
Module 8: Optionel subject 1: HMEK03191E
Module 8: Optionel subject 1: HMEK03201E
Module 8: Optionel subject 2: HMEK03211E
Module 8: Optionel subject 2: HMEK03221E:

Hallin, D., & Mancini, P. (2004). Comparing media systems: Three models of media and politics. New York: Cambridge University Press

Additional literature:

The list below should be seen as inspirational. A compendium and a detailed list of assigned readings for the class will be made available before the course starts.

Christians, C. G.; Glasser, T.L.; McQuail, D.; Nordenstreng, K. & White, R. A. (2009). Normative theories of the media: journalism in democratic societies. Urbana: University of Illinois Press

Chakrabarty, D. (2000). Provincialising Europe: Postcolonial thought and historical differences. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Curran, J., & Park, M-J. (2000). Beyond globalization theory. In J. Curran & M.-J. Park (Eds.), De-Westernizing media studies (pp. 3–8). London: Routledge

Hallin, D., & Mancini, P. (Eds.) (2012). Comparing media system beyond the Western world. New York: Cambridge University Press

Hanitzsch, T. (2007). Deconstructing journalism culture: Toward a universal theory. Communication Theory, 17(4), 367–385

Said, E. (1978). Orientalism. Vintage Books.

Siebert, F., Peterson, T., & Schramm, W. (1956). Four theories of the press. Urbana: University of Illinois Press

Sparks, C. (2007). Globalization, development and the mass media. London: Sage

Wang, G. (Ed.). (2010). De-Westernizing communication research: altering questions and changing frameworks. London: Routledge

Wasserman, H. & de Beer, A. S. (2009). Towards de-westernizing journalism studies. In: Wahl-Jorgensen, K. & Hanitzsch, T. (Eds.), The handbook of journalism studies (pp. 428-438). London: Routledge

Weaver, D. H. (Ed.). (1998). The global journalist: News people around the world. Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press

Xiaoge, X. (2009) Development journalism. In: Wahl-Jorgensen, K. & Hanitzsch, T. (Eds.), The handbook of journalism studies (pp. 357-370). London: Routledge
A general understanding of media studies is recommended for following the course. Students not accustomed to media studies will be presented with a list of recommended readings before the first class.
Credit
15 ECTS
Type of assessment
Other
For details, see the curriculum
Criteria for exam assesment
Links to curriculums:

Master in Film and Media Studies, 2013-curriculum:
http:/​/​hum.ku.dk/​uddannelser/​aktuelle_studieordninger/​film_medievidenskab/​Film_and_Media_Studies_2013.pdf   

Curriculum for the Master’s Programme in Film Studies, The 2008 Curriculum:
http:/​/​filmandmedia.ku.dk/​curricula/​upload-dokumenter/​Film_Studies_KA_2008_just_2010.pdf

Curriculum for Master's Programme in Media Studies, The 2008 Curriculum:
http:/​/​filmandmedia.ku.dk/​curricula/​upload-dokumenter/​Media_Studies_KA_2008_just_2010.pdf
  • Category
  • Hours
  • Class Instruction
  • 42
  • Course Preparation
  • 367,5
  • Total
  • 409,5