ASTK18281U Jean Monnet: The EU as an International Actor

Volume 2020/2021
Education

Bachelor: 7,5 ECTS

Kandidat: 7,5 ECTS

 

Notice: It is only possible to enroll for one course having a 3-day compulsory written take-home assignment exam due to coincident exam periods.

Content
  • The aim of the Jean Monnet Programme Spring 2020 is to provide students with theoretical tools and empirical knowledge for studying the EU as an external actor in today´s world. The programme will present the main dimensions in the study of the EU as an external actor drawing on relevant theories, concepts and approaches. It is possible to obtain a diploma if you participate in at least 10 of the public lectures.

 

  • The programme consists of two parts: Jean Monnet Workshops and Jean Monnet Lectures. The weekly workshops consist of presentations and discussions of the academic texts pertaining to the topic of the week. Following each workshop, a weekly guest lecture given by a prominent practitioner or academic within the field places the topic of the week in a wider perspective.

 

  • The first main theme of the course is the main features of EU decision-making in the field of foreign policy and its central actors. The principal stages in the institutional development of the EU as an external actor will be analysed, and conceptual tools for understanding EU decisions in the field of foreign policy will be provided. The central role of member states will be dealt with. The implications of the Lisbon Treaty will be discussed. The second main theme of the course is the question of how to understand and analyse the international role of the EU. Here we study the main theories to understand the EU as an international actor. The third focus of the course is a study of the different areas which illustrate the role of the EU in different areas. We will look at many aspects of general foreign policy and areas such as security, trade and development and human rights. The course will also present the debate about the EU as a civilian/normative actor.
Learning Outcome

Knowledge:

  • Know the main theoretical approaches for analysing the EU as an external actor (neorealism, neoliberal institutionalism, constructivism, intergovernmentalism, neofunctionalism)
  • Know the central approaches to decision-making in EU foreign policy including the role of the member states
  • Know the main functional and geographical areas in which the EU is an international actor
  • Know the discussion about evaluation of EU external action.
  • Know the debate about the EU as a normative power
  • Know the debate about Europeanization.

 

Skills:

  • Be able to draw on the main theoretical approaches to analyse the EU as an external actor in concrete analyses of EU foreign policy areas.
  • Be able to draw on the central approaches to decision-making in EU foreign policy to analyse concrete decisions.
  • Be able draw on the discussion about the evaluation of EU external action in relation to concrete policy areas
  • Be able to draw on the debate about the EU as a normative power in relation to concrete policy areas
  • Understand the role and development of the EU in the field of defence.
  • Be able to use terms from the literature about Europeanization in relation to concrete foreign policy areas.

 

Competences:

  • Be able to undertake broader analyses of the role of the EU in world politics today on the basis of solid theoretical and empirical knowledge.
  • Be able  to engage in broader analyses and debate about decision-making in EU foreign policy including the role of the member states
  • Be able to draw on the literature about the evaluation of EU external action in broader analyses of EU foreign policy
  • Be able to draw on the literature about the EU as a normative power in broader analyses and debates.
  • Be able to draw on concepts from the foreign policy Europeanization literature in broader analyses and debates about the role of the EU in Member State foreign policy

Uddrag af litteraturliste:

Friis, Anna Maria and Ana E. Juncos (2019) “The European Union’s Foreign, Security, and Defence Policies”, ch. 19 in Cini, Michelle and Nieves Perez-Solorzano Borrogan (eds.), European Union Politics (6th ed.), pp. 281-294 (13 pages)

Barnett, Michael (2016), “Social Constructivism”, in: Baylis, John, Steve Smith & Patricia Owens (eds.). (2016) The Globalization of World Politics: An Introduction to International Relations, (7. ed.), pp. 144-159 (15 pages)

Hansen, Lene (2016), “Poststructualism”, in: Baylis, John, Steve Smith & Patricia Owens (eds.). (2016) The Globalization of World Politics: An Introduction to International Relations, (7. ed.), pp. 159-174 (15 pages)

Dunne, Tim and Brian C. Schmidt (2016), “Realism”, in: Baylis, John, Steve Smith & Patricia Owens (eds.). (2016) The Globalization of World Politics: An Introduction to International Relations, (7. ed.), pp.101-116 (15 pages)

Dunne, Tim (2016), “Liberalism”, in: Baylis, John, Steve Smith & Patricia Owens (eds.). (2016) The Globalization of World Politics: An Introduction to International Relations, (7. ed.), pp. 116-129 (13 pages)

Kurki, Milja & Colin Wright (2016): International Relations and Social Science. I: Dunne et al. (2016), International Relations Theories: Discipline and Diversity (4.ed), Oxford University Press, ch. 1 (21 pages)

Jensen, Carsten Strøby (2019) “Neo-functionalism”, ch. 4 in Cini, Michelle and Nieves Perez- Solorzano Borrogan (eds.), European Union Politics (6th ed.), pp. 55-69 (14 pages)

Cini, Michelle (2019), “Intergovernmentalism”, ch. 5 in Cini, Michelle and Nieves Perez-Solorzano Borrogan (eds.), European Union Politics (6th ed.), pp. 69-82 (13 pages)

Rosamond, Ben (2016), “Theorizing the European Union after Integration Theory”, ch. 6 in Cini, Michelle and Nieves Perez-Solorzano Borrogan (eds.), European Union Politics (6th ed.), pp. 83-101 (18 pages)

Andreata, F. & L. Zambernadi (2017): “the European Union as a Power”, ch.4 in  Hill, Smith & Vanhoonacker (eds.) (2017): International Relations and the European Union. OUP (22 pages)

Beach, D. (2015): “Liberal International Relations Theories and EU Foreign Policy”, ch.6 in Jørgensen Aarstedm Drieskens, Laatikainen & Tonra (eds.) (2015): The Sage Handbook of European Foreign Policy, London: SAGE (12 pages)

Reichwein (2015): “Realism and European Foreign Policy: Promisses and Shortcomings”, ch.7 in Jørgensen, Aarstedm Drieskens, Laatikainen & Tonra (eds.) (2015): The Sage Handbook of European Foreign Policy, London: SAGE (12 pages)

Aydn-Dzgit, S. (2015): “Social-Constructivist and Discursive Approaches to European foreign Policy, ch.9 in Jørgensen, Aarstedm Drieskens, Laatikainen & Tonra (eds.) (2015): The Sage Handbook of European Foreign Policy, London: SAGE (12 pages)

Keukeleire, Stephan and Tom Delreux (2014): The Foreign Policy of the European Union, ch. 1, 6, 12 and 13 (88 pages)

Jørgensen, Knud Erik (1998), “The European Union’s Performance in World Politics: How Should We Measure Success?”, in: Zielonka, Jan (ed.), Paradoxes of European Foreign Policy, The Hague: Klüwer Law International, pp. 87-103 (16 pages)

Bretherton, Charlotte and John Vogler (2013): “A global actor past its peak?”, International Relations 27(3) 375–390 (15 pages)

Keukeleire, Stephan and Tom Delreux (2014): The Foreign Policy of the European Union, Ch. 3 and 4 (54 pages)

Von Ondarza, N and Scheler, R (2017) The High Representative’s  ’Double Hat’: How Mogherini and Ashton have differed in their links with the Commission. LSE EUROPP (London:LSE) (4 pages)

European Council of Foreign Relations (2019): Borrell Returns: His vision for Europe.

https:/​/​www.ecfr.eu/​article/​commentary_borrell_returns_his_vision_for_europe.

Juncos, A. & K. Pomorska (2015): “The European External Action” ch.16 in Jørgensen, Aarstedm Drieskens, Laatikainen & Tonra (eds.) (2015): The Sage Handbook of European Foreign Policy, London: SAGE (12 pages)

Keukeleire, Stephan and Tom Delreux (2014): The Foreign Policy of the European Union, Ch. 5 (18 pages)

Wong, Reuben (2017) “The Role of the Member States: The Europeanization of foreign policy?” ch. 7. in Christopher Hill, Michael Smith and Sophie Vanhoonacker (2017): International Relations and the European Union, Oxford University Press (21 pages)

Delreux, T. (2015): “Bureacratic politics, new institutionalism, and principal-agent”, ch. 10 in Jørgensen, Aarstedm Drieskens, Laatikainen & Tonra (eds.) (2015): The Sage Handbook of European Foreign Policy, London: SAGE (13 pages)

Dür, Andreas and Manfred Elsig (2011): `Principals, agents, and the European Union ́s foreign economic policies ́ in Journal of European Public Policy, pp. 323-338 (16 pages)

Meunier, Sophie and Nicolaides, Kalypso (2017), “The EU as a Trade Power”, in: Hill, Christopher and Smith, Michael (eds.), International Relations and the European Union, Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 247-269 (23 pages)

Damro, Chad (2012) 'Market Power Europe' i Journal of European Public Policy, vol.19(5):682-699 (17 pages)

Young, Alasdair R. and Vicki L. Birchfield (2018) “Empirical Scene Setting: The Contours of the Crisis and Response, ch. 2 in Vicki L. Birchfield and Alasdair R. Young (eds.) (2018) Triangular Diplomacy among the United States, the European Union, and the Russian Federation, Palgrave Macmillan, pp.23-30 (7 pages)

Smith, Nicholas Ross (2014) “The EU’s Difficulty in Translating Interests into Effective Foreign Policy Action: A Look at the Ukraine Crisis”, The Baltic Journal of European Studies, vol.4:1(16), pp.54-68 (14 pages)

Sjursen, Helene and Guri Rosén (2017) “Arguing Sanctions. On the EU’s Response to the Crisis in Ukraine”,Journal of Common Market Studies, Vol.55(1), pp.20-36 (16 pages)

Vogler, J. (2017): “The Challenge of the Environment, Energy, and Climate Change” ch.12 in Hill, Smith & Vanhoonacker (eds.) (2017) International Relations and the European Union, OUP (27 pages)

Fischer, Severin and Oliver Geden (2015): “The Changing Role of International Negotiations in EU Climate Policy”, The International Spectator, 50:1, 1-7 (7 pages)

Parker, Charles, C. Karlsson & Mattias Hjerpe (2017): Assessing the European Union’s global Climate change leadership: from Copenhagen to the Paris Agreement” in Journal of European Integration, vol.39, no.3, ppp.239-252 (23 pages)

Gippner, Olivia (2016): “The 2 C target: a European norm enters the international stage—following the process to adoption in China”, Int Environ Agreements (2016) 16:49–65 (17 pages)

Manners, Ian (2002), “Normative Power Europe: A Contradiction in Terms?”, Journal of Common Market Studies, Vol. 40, No 2, Pp. 235-258 (24 pages)

Larsen, H. (2014): The EU as a Normative power and the Research on External Perceptions: The Missing Link, Journal of Common Market Studies, vol. 52(4) (14 pages)

Sjursen, H. (2017): “The EU's Principles in World Politics” ch.19 in Hill, Smith & Vanhoonacker (eds.) (2017) International Relations and the European Union, OUP (19 pages)

Keukeleire, Stephan & Tom Delreux (2014) “The Foreign Policy of the European Union” Ch. 11, pp.242-271 (29 pages)

Korosteleva, Elena (2018): “The Challenges of a changing eastern neighbourhood” in Schumacher, Thobias, Andreas Marchetti and Thomas Demmelhuber (2018): The Routledge Handbook on the European Neighbourhood Policy, Ch.15, pp.167-177 (10 pages)

Johansson-Nogués, E. (2018): “The EU’s ontological (in)security: Stabilising the ENP area…and the EU itself?” in Cooperation and Conflict, vol.53(4):528-544 (16 pages)

Howorth, Jolyon (2017): “‘Stability on the Borders’: The Ukraine Crisis and the EU’s Constrained Policy Towards the Eastern Neighbourhood”, Journal of Commen Market Studies 55 (1), pp.121-136 (15 pages)

Hollis, Simon (2014): “The Global Construction of EU Development Policy”, Journal of European Integration, 36:6, 567-583 (15 pages)

 

 

Requirements
Basic knowledge of international relations and its theories – the two first workshops will summarize these briefly. Knowledge and an interest in the European Union as well as a willingness to read the weekly assignments, to carry out the required tasks as well as to participate actively in the exercises and discussions.
Student participation:
Students are expected to come prepared for each class incl. having read the workshop’s compulsory readings and to participate actively in the discussions and exercises. Based on the learning objectives of the course, part of the course will consist of student participation in different forms. To prepare you for the exam, the workshop will include different interactive exercises where you will get the chance to work with the curriculum in a hands-on way. This will include matrix-, mind-map and debate exercises as well as simulations of EU negotiations and decision-making. In this way you will learn how to use the presented perspectives in debates, to understand and use the presented theories as arguments and to become familiar with the different perspectives of the theoretical discussions presented in the curriculum.
  • Category
  • Hours
  • Class Instruction
  • 28
  • Total
  • 28
Feedback by final exam (In addition to the grade)
Credit
7,5 ECTS
Type of assessment
Written assignment
Three-day compulsory written take-home assignment
Marking scale
7-point grading scale
Censorship form
No external censorship
Re-exam

Free written assignment

Criteria for exam assesment

Criteria for exam assesment

  • Grade 12 is given for an outstanding performance: the student lives up to the course's goal description in an independent and convincing manner with no or few and minor shortcomings
  • Grade 7 is given for a good performance: the student is confidently able to live up to the goal description, albeit with several shortcomings
  • Grade 02 is given for an adequate performance: the minimum acceptable performance in which the student is only able to live up to the goal description in an insecure and incomplete manner