SFKM10193U  Veterinary Epidemiology, part 2

Volume 2015/2016
Education

Master's Programme in Veterinary Public Health - elective

Content

Aim
The aims of the course are to 1) enable the participant to establish suitable hypotheses which can be tested using relevant data and data analyses, and 2) carry out, present and interpret the results of such analyses on the participants own epidemiological data, presented in the form of a draft manuscript for an international peer-reviewed journal.

Content
The course focuses on epidemiological analysis of continuous and dichotomous data, but also includes analysis of count data. Hypothesis establishment and testing, along with assessment of causality and bias are carried out. Methods include linear regression, analysis of variance, chi-square test, logistic regression and logistic analysis, multivariable logistic analysis, interaction, confounding and non-parametric analyses.
 

Learning Outcome

At the end of the course it is expected that the participant has acquired the following:
Knowledge:
Identify an epidemiological problem to be investigated using relevant analytical methods.
Specifically, the participant should be able to identify and address potential problems in the data, such as bias and/or confounding and clustering.
Skills:
Use relevant epidemiological and statistical methods for descriptive and analytical epidemiological studies.
Competences:
Conduct simple epidemiological analyses independently.
Collaborate scientifically with epidemiologists and statisticians and other relevant scientists on epidemiological problems going beyond this course. 
Be able to evaluate the validity and reliability of the epidemiological results in relation to generalising to other populations than the study population.

Houe H, Ersbøll AK, Toft N: Introduction to Veterinary Epidemiology. Biofolia. 2004.
Dalgaard P: Introductory Statistics with R. Springer. 2008.
Dohoo I, Martin W, Stryhn H: Veterinary Epidemiologic Research. 2nd ed. Ver Inc. 2009.

A BSc or MSc degree in veterinary medicine, human medicine,
agricultural sciences, engineering or natural science is required – and
at least two years of relevant professional experience. If you wish
to attend single courses, the above mentioned requirements can be
deviated.
Good English language skills are required.
SFKM10189U, Veterinary Epidemiology, part 1.
The course is taught as eLearning in weeks 43-49, with exam held in week 50. During the course, the participant has to present parts of a report step-by-step, which will ultimately form the basis for the exam (and a draft manuscript suitable for publication in a peer-reviewed scientific journal). The contents and data analyses are discussed with the other participants during the course.
100 % e-learning course
Credit
6 ECTS
Type of assessment
Written assignment
Oral examination, 30 minutes
During the course, the participants must write and submit a individual report with analyses of epidemiological data as a basis for oral examination.
The report is defended at an oral exam with 15 minutes for presentation, and 15 minutes for questions from the examiners.
The exam takes places in e-learning environment.
Exam registration requirements

The student has actively been engaged in discussions in e-learning environment.

Aid
All aids allowed
Marking scale
passed/not passed
Censorship form
No external censorship
More than one internal examiner
Exam period

Exam 7-12 December 2015

Criteria for exam assesment

Knowledge:
Identify an epidemiological problem to be investigated using relevant analytical methods.
Specifically, the participant should be able to identify and address potential problems in the data, such as bias and/or confounding and clustering.
Skills:
Use relevant epidemiological and statistical methods for descriptive and analytical epidemiological studies.
Competences:
Conduct simple epidemiological analyses independently.
Collaborate scientifically with epidemiologists and statisticians and other relevant scientists on epidemiological problems going beyond this course. 
Be able to evaluate the validity and reliability of the epidemiological results in relation to generalising to other populations than the study population.

To pass the course you have to: a) do each of the tasks described in the course plan (see below) before the deadline specified; b) provide a final report; and c) pass the exam demonstrating that you master the Learning Outcomes (specified in the Course Description (Appendix 1)).

  • Category
  • Hours
  • Theory exercises
  • 20
  • Practical exercises
  • 20
  • Preparation
  • 40
  • Project work
  • 84
  • Exam
  • 1
  • Total
  • 165