ASTK15631U  SEMINAR: Global Public Governance

Volume 2015/2016
Content
Content

It has been argued that global public governance (GPG) involves new forms of politics, representation and layers of emerging governance, both internationally and locally, constituting multi-layered public governance. This seminar studies these rapidly evolving relationships between public policy and the institutions of global governance, including an understanding of how such institutions themselves provide forms of international, transnational, and supranational public policy. The seminar reflects two sides of this relationship: what is the impact of emerging global governance on national public policy? And what is the role of national and regional public policy within institutions of global governance?? Besides describing such recent developments and the challenges these present to changing understandings of GPG, the seminar provides important theoretical approaches from organisational theory, public policy, globalisation and global governance. The seminar will provide the analytical tools for understanding GPG, and will use a series of case studies to analyse this. Students will thus have the opportunity to develop critical and analytical faculties in the contextual analysis of these case studies. The key debates and discussions of the normative challenges of GPG, the complex interplay of current global crises, and the role of rapidly changing public policy are at the centre of the seminar.

Preliminary plan:

Introduction to global public governance -

  1. Understanding global public governance
  2. Global and regional governance
  3. State and non-state actors

Cases in global public governance -

  1.  Economics
  2.  Society
  3.  Environment
  4.  Conflict
  5.  Politics
  6. Conclusion: moving from globalisation to global public governance
  7.  
  8. The seminar consists of nine 3-hour sessions placing a heavy emphasis on active learning through case study work. The seminar begins by contextualising the understanding, theories and history of global public governance. The seminar will secondly look at the interaction of the institutions of global and regional governance, as well as state and non-state actors. The seminar will then thirdly study a series of five case studies in order to provide empirical illustrations of the interlinking of global public governance in areas such as economics, social issues, the environment, peace and security, and finally politics and global governance. This series of case studies will be used to provide concrete examples and develop analytical skills of global public governance. This will involve examining the role of national, international and supranational actors and organisations. Questions raised in the seminar include more empirical issues such as what are the predominant institutions of global governance under conditions of globalisation? How has public policy become global within these institutions? How do institutions of global governance impact on national public policy? How do actors in national and international settings interact with these institutions of global governance? What theories best explain such roles, interactions and impacts?
Learning Outcome

The aim of the seminar is to enable the student to:

  • Describe the recent evolution of public policy found in global governance
  • Present central theoretical perspectives of public policy, globalisation and global governance. 
  • Apply these theoretical perspectives to contemporary themes in global public governance including economic, social, environmental, conflictual and political issues.
  • Understand the complex interplay of contemporary global crises in global public governance.

Be familiar with the role of current public policies in a conte

 

 

Archer, Clive, International Organisations, 4th edn. (Routledge, 2014).

Barkin , J. Samuel, International Organization, 2nd edn. (Palgrave, 2013). 

Best, Jacqueline, and Alexandra Gheciu (eds.), The Return of the Public in Global Governance(Cambridge University Press, 2014).

Gaskarth, Jamie (ed.) Rising Powers, Global Governance and Global Ethics (Routledge, 2015).

Goldin, Ian, Divided Nations: Why global governance is failing, and what we can do about it(Routledge, 2013).

Hale, Thomas, David Held and Kevin Young, Gridlock: Why Global Cooperation is Failing when We Need It Most (Polity Press, 2013).

Harman, Sophie, and David Williams (eds.) Governing the World?: Cases in Global Governance(Routledge, 2013).

Held, David, and Charles Roger (eds.) Global Governance at Risk (Polity Press, 2013).

Hurd, Ian, International Organizations: Politics, Law, Practice, 2nd edition (Cambridge University Press, 2013).

Payne, Anthony, and Stephen Buzdugan, The Long Battle for Global Economic Governance(Routledge, 2015).  

Weiss, Thomas, Global Governance: Why? What? Whither? (Polity Press, 2013).

Weiss, Thomas, Governing the World?: Addressing “Problems Without Passports” (Paradigm,  2014).

Weiss, Thomas, and Rorden Wilkinson (eds.) International Organization and Global Governance(Routledge, 2013).

 

A detailed list of required readings will be provided during the seminar.

BA level in political science or similar competences and an interest in reflections on global public governance.
Grade 12 is given for an outstanding performance: the student lives up to the course’s goal description in an independent and convincing manner with no or few and minor shortcomings

Grade 7 given for a good performance: the student is confidently able to live up to the goal description, albeit with several shortcomings

Grade 02 is given for an adequate performance: the minimum acceptable performance in which the student is only able to live up to the goal description in an insecure and incomplete manner
This Active Learning seminar requires Preparation, Participation, and Positive attitude. Preparation means that the seminar takes the form of Active Learning involving continuous assessment. Seminar assignments are compulsory and are continuously assessed. Seminar assignments must be written individually. Participation means that in order to pass the seminar, students must actively participate through a minimum of 75% (7 out of 9 meetings). Positive attitude means that students will constructively participate in a number of group learning activities which form the core of the seminar.
Credit
7,5 ECTS
Type of assessment
Written assignment
Individual written assignment
Marking scale
7-point grading scale
Censorship form
No external censorship
Criteria for exam assesment
  • Grade 12 is given for an outstanding performance: the student lives up to the course’s goal description in an independent and convincing manner with no or few and minor shortcomings  
     
  • Grade 7 given for a good performance: the student is confidently able to live up to the goal description, albeit with several shortcomings  
     
  • Grade 02 is given for an adequate performance: the minimum acceptable performance in which the student is only able to live up to the goal description in an insecure and incomplete manner
  • Category
  • Hours
  • Class Instruction
  • 28
  • Course Preparation
  • 123
  • Preparation
  • 15
  • Exercises
  • 40
  • Total
  • 206