ASTK15609U  SUMMER15: The Rise of China in Domestic, Regional and Global Contexts

Volume 2015/2016
Education

Master level: 7.5 ECTS 
Bachelor level: 10 ECTS 

Content

Introduction and objectives:

The Rise of China is reshaping the regional and global distribution of economic, political and military power. What kind of world power will China be? This question and more generally questions about how to approach the Rise of China theoretically and politically are among the most debated in Western International Relations environments. How Chinese leaders use China’s newly gained power in the coming years will have profound consequences for the rest of the world. Recent developments in Chinese foreign policy behaviour perceived as increasingly assertive and even aggressive have further raised the stakes and the demand for well-informed analyses.

This summer school sets out to thoroughly analyze and discuss the changing roles and policies of China in the international system – what are the driving factors and dynamics, the main implications and challenges? Specific emphasis is on gaining insights and knowledge about how the Chinese perceive, discuss and decide on the changing responsibilities and policies of China in the international system.

Structure:

The course is divided into four parts. The first part constitutes a general presentation of the course with focus on the background, objectives and expectations as well as a general introduction to China and China as an international actor. The first part also includes introduction to the on-going debate about ‘how to study China’, i.e. introduction to the main theoretical and historical approaches and arguments in the Western and Chinese academic debate on the Rise of China. In the second part the focus is on identifying the driving factors and dynamics behind the changing roles and policies of China in the international system. Understanding of the driving factors and the way they interact and exert influence is needed to comprehend the complexity behind the Rise of China on the world stage. The analysis is divided into three ‘levels’ - the global sources (unipolarity/change of polarity/end of global polarity, globalisation/global financial and governance crisis, multilateralism/unilateralism), regional sources (developments in economic, political and security relations with regional states and in the U.S. role and policy in the region) and domestic sources (e.g. cultural, historical, ideological and political factors) of Chinese foreign policy behaviour. The findings are investigated in more detail in the third part, where several case studies are conducted examining recent developments in Chinese foreign policy behaviour on certain issues in the area of international economy, politics and security hereby specifying how the identified driving factors interact and exert influence. In the fourth and last part, focus returns to the overall questions of the driving factors and dynamics, the main implications and challenges related to the Rise of China for Chinese leaders as well as for the region and the U.S. Specific attention is given to the way the U.S. is trying - especially through the American re-balancing or ‘pivot’ strategy in the Asia-Pacific - to ‘manage’ the Rise of China. The discussion also returns to the Western and Chinese academic debate on the Rise of China assessing the main theoretical and historical approaches and arguments.

Requirements:

Students are expected to have knowledge and understanding of theoretical concepts, insights and approaches from International Relations and Comparative Politics. Strong knowledge of Chinese history, politics and security is not required. 

Learning Outcome

More specifically regarding competence profile and goal description, the aim is that the students upon conclusion of the summer school:

  • Show knowledge of and insights into the important developments and challenges related to the changing roles and policies of China in the international system.
  • Show an ability to describe the main characteristics of the development in Chinese foreign policy behaviour and of China as an international actor.
  • Show an ability to present and discuss the main arguments in the academic debate on the Rise of China, including the theoretical underpinning of the main arguments.
  • Show analytical skills in conducting theoretically grounded examinations of Chinese foreign policy behaviour on specific issues and cases included in the course.
  • Show an ability to assess the importance of factors on the domestic, regional and global level for the development of China as an international actor.
  • Show an ability to derive theoretically grounded reflections on how to expect China to further develop as an international actor.

The main books to be used are:

  • Marc Lanteigne, Chinese Foreign Policy: An Introduction, New York: Routledge, 2013 (second edition)
  • Guo Sujian, Chinese Politics and Government: Power, Ideology and Organization, New York: Routledge, 2013
  • Andrew J. Nathan & Andrew Scobell, China’s Search for Security, New York: Columbia University Press, 2012
  • Brantly Womack (ed.), China’s Rise in Historical Perspective, New York: Rowman & Littlefield, 2010
  • David Shambaugh (ed.), Charting China’s Future. Domestic and International Challenges, New York: Routledge, 2011
  • Nina Hachigian (ed.), Debating China. The U.S.-China relationship in ten conversations, Oxford University Press, 2014
Upon conclusion of the summer school, students will be able to conduct theoretically sophisticated and well-researched analyses and discussions related to the ongoing debate on the Rise of China and on the role China will play in future world affairs. Also, students will become highly knowledgeable of important current developments and challenges in Chinese politics, economy and society. Students will furthermore develop valuable skills on how to write short policy reports based on theoretically-informed analyses of concrete cases and issues.
The summer school consists of lectures, class discussion, group-work and exercises, student presentations and guest lectures as well as field trips to e.g. the Chinese Embassy in Copenhagen and to the Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Students must participate actively in all lessons and hand in three written assignments in order to pass.
Credit
7,5 ECTS
Type of assessment
Written assignment
Individual seminar assignment
Exam registration requirements

75% parcipitation

Marking scale
passed/not passed
Censorship form
No external censorship
Criteria for exam assesment

Evaluated by the lecturer with passed/not-passed

  • Category
  • Hours
  • Class Instruction
  • 28
  • Total
  • 28