SHUA11004U  Human Anatomy and Systems Physiology

Volume 2013/2014
Education
MSc Programme in Human Biology - compulsory
Content

The anatomical part of the course includes histology. When completing the course, students shall be able to explain the structure and function of tissue, including descriptions of cell types and cellular structures by microscopy. Furthermore, the course comprises body anatomy including description of organs and embryology, describing the dynamic development of the body's structures as well as developmental defects.
Furthermore, it is the objective of the course to impart to students who have not completed a university level course on systems physiology a series of fundamental prerequisites to the subsequent acquisition of knowledge in a range of the master's fields of knowledge, particularly pathophysiology and pharmacology.

Learning Outcome

At the end of the course, the student is able to:

  • Account for various cell types
  • Explain and discuss the composition of specific tissue types such as epithelial, muscle, connective tissue and similar.
  • Explain and compare the anatomy of viscera, skin and reproductive organs
  • Explain and discuss the macroscopic skeleton and the neuromuscular system
  • Explain embryology
  • Explain and compare the structures of the nervous system, neurones, glial cells, etc.
  • Account for the central nervous system
  • Explain the concept of physiological homeostasis
  • Explain and discuss general qualitative models for physiological control systems
  • Employ such models as analytical tools to explain and compare the function of major physiological systems, including the circulatory and respiratory systems, the gastrointestinal system, the kidneys, the metabolism and the endocrine glands
  • Explain and discuss general principles of cellular communication, including the importance of various forms of signal molecules, cellular receptors and intracellular events leading to impulse generation, muscle contraction or transport of matter, e.g. internal and external secretion
  • Explain selected classical examples of pathophysiological mechanisms
  • Provide classical examples of the mode of action of pharmaceuticals
Lecturers and class-based training
Credit
7,5 ECTS
Type of assessment
Oral examination, 20 minutes
Oral exam without preparation time
Aid
Without aids
Marking scale
passed/not passed
Censorship form
No external censorship
More than one internal examiner
Exam period
Week 4, 2014
Criteria for exam assesment

To pass exam the student shall be able to:

  • Account for various cell types
  • Explain and discuss the composition of specific tissue types such as epithelial, muscle, connective tissue and similar.
  • Explain and compare the anatomy of viscera, skin and reproductive organs
  • Explain and discuss the macroscopic skeleton and the neuromuscular system
  • Explain embryology
  • Explain and compare the structures of the nervous system, neurones, glial cells, etc.
  • Account for the central nervous system
  • Explain the concept of physiological homeostasis
  • Explain and discuss general qualitative models for physiological control systems
  • Employ such models as analytical tools to explain and compare the function of major physiological systems, including the circulatory and respiratory systems, the gastrointestinal system, the kidneys, the metabolism and the endocrine glands
  • Explain and discuss general principles of cellular communication, including the importance of various forms of signal molecules, cellular receptors and intracellular events leading to impulse generation, muscle contraction or transport of matter, e.g. internal and external secretion
  • Explain selected classical examples of pathophysiological mechanisms
  • Provide classical examples of the mode of action of pharmaceuticals
  • Category
  • Hours
  • Lectures
  • 54
  • Class Instruction
  • 50
  • Preparation
  • 101
  • Exam
  • 1
  • Total
  • 206